Category Archives: Podcast

HTF 028: Chicken Eggs and Chasin’ Dreams

In this episode, we sit down with Henlight Co-Founder, Edward Silva.

Edward’s unique story highlights the path that some entrepreneurs take when entering into prize-based competitions, in this case the Thought For Food Challenge. Interestingly, Edward’s journey with the Thought For Food Challenge did not end with his team’s victory. Instead, along with a small team of enthusiastic volunteers, they expanded the reach of this challenge worldwide, inspiring innovative ideas from young people across the globe.

Guest: Edward Silva

In his words:

I believe in leveraging the power of technology to create a more food secure world. As a Prize Developer at XPrize and co-founder of Henlight – a solar powered solution to help small-scale poultry farmers – I actively support building a bridge to a more abundant future by leveraging appropriate technology.

Throughout my career, I have been afforded the opportunity to participate in an array of activities in the U.S. and abroad related to food, agriculture, and renewable/natural resources . Winning the 2013 Thought for Food Challenge, being selected as U.S. Delegate for the Y20 Summit, studying international agricultural development at the University of California, Davis and most recently serving as Executive Director of Thought For Food, have allowed me to gain a unique global perspective on how to develop products and solutions in a more creative, open, and innovative way.

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • Edward’s story, and the way he drew on his own experiences to come up with a novel innovation.
  • How the Thought For Food Challenge incentivized the innovations behind Henlight.
  • The story of Edward’s journey after winning the challenge, and how an ambassador network allows Thought For Food to expand their global reach.
  • Examples of winners and innovations from the Thought For Food Challenge.
  • How incentive-based prizes inspire innovation in areas that may be lacking new ideas.

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HTF 025: Women Impact Investment

If women farmers had the same financial resources as male farmers, it’s estimated that yields would increase by 20-30%, creating the potential to lift 120-150 million people out of poverty.
—Malaika Maphalala, Investment Advisor, Natural Investments

In this podcast, Amy Pearl is joined by Malaika Maphalala and Carrie Van Winkle of Natural Investments, LLC, a socially responsible investment firm, to discuss the growing and influential role of women across the global impact investing landscape.  Carrie and Malaika also host their own web interview series called “Women Invested” that details pioneering women who are changing the world in a positive way through investment decisions.  Prepare for some inspiration, as we realize that the more we invest in women, the more we create resilient communities, and healthy returns, which is a pretty good deal.

Guests

Malaika Maphalala, Investment Advisor, Natural Investments, LLC

Joining Natural Investments was the culmination of her life-long journey of contributing to the creation of a sustainable future. For the past ten years, Malaika has shared her talents in non-profit administration and within community arts organizations in Hawaii.

Carrie B. VanWinkle, Socially Responsive Financial Advisor, Natural Investments, LLC

Carrie brings 12 years of experience working with individuals and couples to build confidence in their personal financial lives, including financial goals related to homeownership, retirement savings, and education savings. Carrie’s mission as a financial planner is rooted in the belief in the power of financial goal setting, education, and empowerment to achieve the life you want, while ensuring your finances reflect your values.

Carrie has dedicated her life to building a healthy, sustainable, and just community, both locally and globally. Her work at Natural Investments is a pivotal part in achieving this goal by empowering individuals and families to build their own financially sustainable future while having a positive impact on the community. Carrie is a part of NI’s Louisville-based team at Just Money Advisors.

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • What it Impact Investing is, and why women are playing a larger role.
  • About Malaika and Carrie’s new series on Women-Invested.com
  • Inspiring stories that can help inform your own investment decisions
  • How one investor changed the direction of Root Capital simply by being interested in women run enterprises
  • Some of the data that has emerged from impact investments worldwide
  • What regenerative investment means, and why this concept helps inform your investment decisions

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HTF 024: The Remedy Club Inclusion and Exclusion

htf-podcast

This edition of The Remedy Club talks about systems of exclusion — a spectrum of topics usually deemed inappropriate for the dinner table. By listening to personal stories from our panelists (see below) and conversing with each other about uncomfortable but necessary issues, we take on the challenge of breaking that initial barrier when it comes to the untalkable—starting the conversation.

Welcome to The Remedy Club, a quarterly panel series on the dynamics of power and powerlessness, hosted by Hatch Innovation. We invite you to listen in on this dynamic panel discussion recorded on November 4th, 2016. Walk away with new insight, lasting impressions, new connections and ideas for action. We hope this edition and the one before activates the reverberations and people we need for the next 4 years and beyond.

Panelists

Emilly Prado, Writer, Photographer, Future Librarian
Bertony Faustin, Wine Farmer, Abbey Creek Vineyard
Don MerrillJournalist, Author, Co-Founder of CNBSeen
Charles Letherwood, Board Member of CNBSeen

Moderator

Frankie Ku, Brand and Marketing Manager, Hatch Innovation

In this episode you will learn:

  • Stories of exclusion from audience members and panelists
  • Grassroots, micro-strategies for change
  • How to approach racism and the conversations around it
  • Ownership for solution(s) to systems of oppression
  • How to be an ally

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Toilets, Rice, and Poverty: Redefining Global Aid

toilets-rice-and-poverty

htf-podcastToilets, Rice, and Poverty: Redefining Global Aid with Lin Liu

For years, USAID and other NGOs (non-governmental organizations) have been trying to improve sanitation as well as create a safe water supply for countries throughout the developing world. With varying degrees of success in the cities, only pockets of rural communities have adopted the use of toilets as a means of disposing human waste. As the population in these areas rise, lack of safe sanitation creates an extreme health risk to children and villagers resulting in endemic diarrheal disease. There is one organization, WaterSHED, that has been working on a different approach. Host Amy Pearl had a chance to catch up with WaterSHED’s Director of Strategic Partnerships, Lin Lu, to discuss their amazing work in Cambodia, and more specifically how their market-based approach is helping to speed the adoption of safe sanitation practices in rural communities.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Executive Director, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Lin Liu, Director of Strategic Partnerships, WaterSHED

In this episode you’ll learn

  • Why sanitation projects of the past have proven ineffective, and what the barriers are in regards to sanitation in rural Cambodia
  • What collaborative approaches work best for entrepreneurs and business owners in rural communities
  • How monetary transactions work in a market for sanitation
  • About WaterSHED’s open source design for a toilet
  • How WaterSHED has fostered the behavior change necessary to encourage local adoption
  • WaterSHED’s plan for a business model change, and what methods they have used to help the market for toilets reach 40% saturation


Links to Resources Mentioned

Terms

Micro Finance Institutions (MFI): A microfinance institution is an organization that offers financial services to low income populations. Almost all give loans to their members, and many offer insurance, deposit and other services.

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HTF 020: Remediation Education

Remediation Education: Rural Students Revitalizing Brownfields with Megan Alameda

 

“If you are a teacher who’s interested in brownfields, or any environmental education subject, I’d say go for it. This is the time that is ripe for innovation.  But don’t do this alone, and here’s my callout to everybody else – administrators, city and council members, museums, businesses – please come together to try and make these relevant pieces of education happen. Because that’s how it works – through collaboration.”

What happens when the industries of yesteryear close their doors for good? Often they leave behind sites that harbour contaminants, and pose a serious risk to humans and the environment. There’s a name for places like these – they are called Brownfields. These sites are literally right under our noses, and commonly overlooked by cities due to the prohibitive costs associated with restoring polluted real estate.  One program is training high school students to tackle this issue head on, and in the process giving them learning opportunities that few students get. Out in rural Baker County, Oregon, students managed the remediation process of a brownfield from start to finish – this really is true hands-on education. The site is now clean and cleared for use, and more sites are being lined up for the next generation of students. In recognition of the success of this work, the teacher who led the program, Megan Alameda, was recently awarded the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators at the White House. Amy Pearl spoke with Megan about the program to hear the full story and to get her thoughts on how this new type of hands-on education could be replicated elsewhere.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

 

Guests

Megan Alameda

In this episode you’ll learn

  • What is CTE – Career Technical Education (like Baker Technical Institute)
  • What is a Brownfield, and what impacts a brownfield site can have on the community.
  • How did Megan got involved in brownfield remediation with students, and how a group of students have taken on the role of managing the remediation process for a brownfield in Baker City, OR.
  • How this is a new wave of education, that involves students in the world around them.
  • How brownfield projects spur community development, economic development, community education
  • Upcoming projects in Baker City and the surrounding area (there are 80 potential projects just in that region).
  • How high school teachers can lead similar projects in their own location
  • How these new types of education cannot rest solely on the shoulders of teachers. It takes a lot of collaboration.


Links to Resources Mentioned

White House Announcement: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/08/15/honoring-students-and-teachers-2016-presidential-environmental-education-ceremony

DEQ Brownfields http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/cu/brownfields/

Baker County: http://www.bakercounty.org/

EPA Brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields

Oregon Health Authority Brownfields: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/Brownfields/Pages/index.aspx

Oregonian Newspaper article about Megan and her Presidential award” http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/eastern_oregon_teacher_wins_pr.html

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HTF 020: Remediation Education

remediation-education

Remediation Education: Rural Students Revitalizing Brownfields with Megan Alameda

“If you are a teacher who’s interested in brownfields, or any environmental education subject, I’d say go for it. This is the time that is ripe for innovation.  But don’t do this alone, and here’s my callout to everybody else – administrators, city and council members, museums, businesses – please come together to try and make these relevant pieces of education happen. Because that’s how it works – through collaboration.”

What happens when the industries of yesteryear close their doors for good? Often they leave behind sites that harbour contaminants, and pose a serious risk to humans and the environment. There’s a name for places like these – they are called Brownfields. These sites are literally right under our noses, and commonly overlooked by cities due to the prohibitive costs associated with restoring polluted real estate.  One program is training high school students to tackle this issue head on, and in the process giving them learning opportunities that few students get. Out in rural Baker County, Oregon, students managed the remediation process of a brownfield from start to finish – this really is true hands-on education. The site is now clean and cleared for use, and more sites are being lined up for the next generation of students. In recognition of the success of this work, the teacher who led the program, Megan Alameda, was recently awarded the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators at the White House. Amy Pearl spoke with Megan about the program to hear the full story and to get her thoughts on how this new type of hands-on education could be replicated elsewhere.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation


Links to Resources Mentioned

White House Announcement: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/08/15/honoring-students-and-teachers-2016-presidential-environmental-education-ceremony

DEQ Brownfields http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/cu/brownfields/

Baker County: http://www.bakercounty.org/

EPA Brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields

Oregon Health Authority Brownfields: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/Brownfields/Pages/index.aspx

Oregonian Newspaper article about Megan and her Presidential award” http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/eastern_oregon_teacher_wins_pr.html

Guest

2016-08-16_presidentialeedawards_100Megan Alameda, Baker Technical Institute, Baker City, Oregon

Megan uses a collaborative and interactive teaching process that engages her students to help in the cleanup of a nearby brownfield. The project-based nature of her class allows grades 9 through 12 students to fill brownfield cleanup roles such as managers, coordinators, specialists, researchers, and presenters that best match their individual strengths. Megan’s students have learned about brownfields and presented their knowledge at a public open house and at state brownfield conferences.

 

In this episode you’ll learn

  • What is CTE – Career Technical Education (like Baker Technical Institute)
  • What is a Brownfield, and what impacts a brownfield site can have on the community.
  • How did Megan got involved in brownfield remediation with students, and how a group of students have taken on the role of managing the remediation process for a brownfield in Baker City, OR.
  • How this is a new wave of education, that involves students in the world around them.
  • How brownfield projects spur community development, economic development, community education
  • Upcoming projects in Baker City and the surrounding area (there are 80 potential projects just in that region).
  • How high school teachers can lead similar projects in their own location
  • How these new types of education cannot rest solely on the shoulders of teachers. It takes a lot of collaboration.

 

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HTF 019: Changing Taillights to Avert Tragedies

Changing Taillights to Avert Tragedies

“For many people this is not a huge problem, but for a percentage of people, it can be a deadly problem.” – Don Merrill


Think about it. For some people, a burned-out taillight is a minor maintenance issue. For others, it’s the first step towards a potentially deadly confrontation. After a string of police shootings of unarmed people of color, Don Merrill wants to stop talking and do something. So he’s setting up a nonprofit with a very simple goal: to replace burned-out headlights and taillights on vehicles driven by people of color.

In this episode Amy and Don discuss how this easy step could result in fewer hostile interactions with police, a strengthening of community, and more open discussions between police and residents. You’ll hear how everyone from community colleges to auto parts stores to churches will be involved, and get an insight into the statistics that show why this project is so needed.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

 

Guests

Don Merrill – Owner, Don Merrill & Associates

Currently, working on a book about the public radio pledge drive.

Seven years with Armed Forces Radio and Television. Eleven years as a public relations specialist for the Federal Government. Four years with commercial radio and newspapers. Four years as a freelance writer specializing in feature and investigative reporting.

Goals include telling the little stories of big companies and the big stories of little companies for domestic and international reading audiences. My intention is to build a clientel of commercial, government and non-profit clients who turn to me to promote their work in consumer and trade, print and online publications by emphasizing the human side of that work. I am especially interested in the work of non-profits and am prone to donate work to good causes.

Specialties: Interviewing experience with celebrities, government officials, politicians and man-on-the-street (vox populi). Government and military procedures and protocols experience.

In this episode you’ll learn

  • About Don’s inspiration for starting a nonprofit that does nothing but change headlight/taillight bulbs- “I wanted to stop talking, and stop being consumed by other people talking, and do something.”
  • Why this project is bottom up instead of top down – going into communities and talking to people where they are.
  • The partners will be involved in the project – churches, colleges or places that have automotive repair programs, auto parts stores, community groups.
  • The data that makes this project so compelling.
  • How many people have no concern they’ll be pulled over by police for a broken taillight, let alone be shot by police – while for others it’s a real fear.
  • How so many bad things happen on a daily basis that compete for our attention, resulting in easily-fixable things getting lost in the noise.
  • Why vilifying police or protesters doesn’t fix anything.
  • About ‘broken windows’ policing, and how it has been criticized for leading to assumptions that every car with a broken taillight contains a person of color about to do wrong.
  • How just because officers look like the communities they serve, doesn’t mean that the people in those communities will feel any safer or better treated by the police.
  • What happened when Amy did not behave in the correct way when pulled over, and how that could not happen had she been a person of color.
  • After everything that has happened recently, Don wanted to stop talking, and stop being consumed by other people talking, and do something.
  • How the solutions will be imperfect, but perfect is the enemy of the good. 

 

Links to Resources Mentioned

How to reach Don – CNBSeen: @CNBSeenNow

Don’t shoot PDX https://www.facebook.com/DontShootPDX/

Black Lives Matter http://blacklivesmatter.com/

Driving While Black app: http://dwbtheapp.com/

NAACP Statement on Eric Garner death & ‘broken windows’ policing: http://www.naacp.org/press/entry/naacp-statement-on-death-of-nyc-man-after-police-chokehold

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HTF 018: Finding a Career with Purpose

Finding a Career with Purpose

Finding a Career with Purpose


An honest discussion about finding jobs with meaning – both making a difference in the world, and finding personal satisfaction.
Simon Love and Amy Pearl speak with Mac Prichard, founder of Prichard Communications and Mac’s List about purpose and potential in work and life. Today, people want to improve the world through their work, as well as achieve personal satisfaction. But how do people get into those careers? In this podcast, both hosts and guest are able to share stories and advice of finding work with meaning. Mac offers insights from his conversations with jobseekers, Simon offers personal stories of finding work in a foreign land, and Amy shares stories of change makers starting their own enterprises. You’ll learn tips and advice on how to send your career on a path towards purpose.

This conversation carries on the conversation from the popular ‘Career Pathways to Doing Good in Oregon’ events,  held quarterly at HatchLab in Portland, Oregon.

 

Provocateurs

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

Simon Love, Hatch Innovation

 

Guest

Mac Prichard, President, Pritchard Communications

Mac Prichard owns and operates Prichard Communications, a public relations agency based in Portland, Oregon that works with top-tier foundations, non-profits and purpose driven brands across the country. He is also the publisher of Mac’s List, an online community where professionals find rewarding, interesting jobs and employers find the best possible candidates.

Previously, Mac was communications director for Reclaiming Futures, a national initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that improves drug and alcohol treatment for teens in juvenile court. Before joining Reclaiming Futures in 2001, Mac served as a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Human Services, a speechwriter and deputy legislative director for former Oregon governor John Kitzhaber, and a Portland City Hall spokesman for Earl Blumenauer, now a Member of Congress.

Prior to moving to Oregon in 1991, Mac lived in Massachusetts where he was legislative and media relations director for the state Office for Refugees and Immigrants, the first public information officer for Boston’s “Big Dig,” and a researcher in former U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy’s first Congressional campaign. Previously in Boston as a staff person with the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, Mac helped organize and lead four Congressional fact-finding trips to Central America. Mac was also a senior researcher at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs, a non-partisan human rights group in Washington, DC, that monitors US-Latin American policy.

In this episode you’ll learn

  • Trends in the workplace – are people moving towards careers with purpose? If so, why?
  • What a ‘Dream Job’ means – people want to make a difference in the world but they also want to find satisfaction and happiness.
  • How Mac’s List grew through word of mouth, and where it extends now.
  • How people are not taught at school how to look for jobs, or to set job-related goals.
  • Why do people work?
  • How generational differences and the blurring of work-life boundaries affect how work is seen.
  • Why jobseekers say they want one type of job but take something else .
  • How you can make opportunities happen by being generous to others and thinking about how you can help others in your industry.
  • How sometimes you won’t end up doing what you thought you’d be doing, but you can take charge of the role you’re in and make a difference there.  
  • How individuals can make enormous difference through starting their own social enterprise.
  • The challenges of being an entrepreneur – ‘pushing the noodle up the hill’ and the challenges associated with it.
  • How careers are not a 45 degree trajectory – there will be peaks and valleys.
  • How good things happen when you make your goals known to others.


Links to Resources Mentioned

Hatch Innovation

Mac’s List

‘Find Your Dream Job’ Podcast

‘Find Your Dream Job in Portland’ Book

Prichard Communications

Career Pathways to Doing Good in Oregon event

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HTF 017: Reflecting on a Nuclear Legacy

HTF Podcast June 2016

 img_8239 (1)

Host

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Yukiyo Kawano, Visual Artist

Yukiyo Kawano, a third generation hibakusha (nuclear bomb survivor) grew up decades after the bombing of Hiroshima. Her work is personal, reflecting lasting attitudes towards the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Kawano’s main focus is her/our forgetfulness, her/our dialectics of memory, issues around cultural politics, and historical politics.

For the latest project, she used pieces of translucent kimono fabric and sewed together with strands of her hair (the artist’s DNA as a third generation hibaku-sha), for the possibility of looking inward, suggesting another/personal view to our official receptacle of memory.

During the school show in Vermont, Kawano performed in front of the object in desperation about the urgency of expressing fears about the devastation of our human bodies. The historical conjuncture, with the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the legacy of the nuclear era opened up a space for the performativity of her/our questioning of history, memory, witnessing, and disaster in the present moment.

Kawano is currently living in Portland, Oregon.
email address: yuki@yukiyokawano.com

Allison Cobb, Poet

Allison Cobb is the author of Born2 (Chax Press); Green-Wood (Factory School); Plastic: an autobiography (Essay Press); and After we all died forthcoming in September 2016 from Ahsahta Press, which was a finalist for the National Poetry Series.

Cobb’s work combines historical and scientific research, essay, and poetry to address issues of landscape, politics, and ecology. She was a 2015 finalist for the National Poetry Series; a 2015 Djerassi Resident Artist; a 2014 Playa Resident Artist; received a 2011 Individual Artist Fellowship award from the Oregon Arts Commission; and was a 2009 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow. She works for the Environmental Defense Fund. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she co-curates The Switch reading, art, and performance series.

Meshi Chavez, Performance Artist

Meshi Chavez lives and creates work in Portland Oregon. Meshi’s most recent productions include Being Moved,“…or be dragged.” and  We Two Boys. His work has premiered in both New Mexico and Oregon.

 

When your family is from Hiroshima, you have strong feelings about the nuclear age, war, and its legacy.

Who better to talk about the fallout of our nuclear past than artists? And better, artists who come from cities that were affected and involved. Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano takes her grandmother’s kimono and sews replicas of the bombs that were dropped on her city. She has made Little Boy and Fat Man sewn with her own hair. In a new creation, she has partnered with performance artist Meshi Chavez and poet Allison Cobb to create “A Moment in Time.” How is art an act of activism?

 In this episode you’ll hear

  • How artists and art represent the impacts of science, war, and powerlessness
  • What is Bhuto dance, and how it is a perfect medium for expression and collaboration
  • How a speech by President Obama inspired a poem of sound and words to be shared
  • How art activates a space for contemplation, catharsis, and healing, which is more important (sometimes) than acting
  • Why art is key to helping make invisible things felt and experienced, and why this is so important


Links to Resources Mentioned

Hatch Innovation

Hatch Oregon

 

 

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HTF 016: WTF is the Blockchain?

Ep 16 WTF is the blockchain

WTF is the Blockchain?

You’ve heard about Bitcoin. You might have heard the word ‘blockchain’. But what about Ethereum? In this episode, you’ll get the full explanation of what a blockchain is, how cryptocurrencies have value, and how ‘smart contracts’ are shaping the future of transactions.

You will then hear about one company using this technology – CPay – which is using the Ethereum blockchain to make everyday payments simpler, faster, more secure, and also provide community benefit. Simon Love speaks with founder Jon Underwood and lead developer Ryan Casey about this fascinating technology. Listen in to hear why Jon says “Ethereum will either thrive or fade away based on how well it can solve real-world problems with smart contracts”

 

Jon Underwood

Founder and CEO, cPay

Jon UnderwoodJon Underwood is the Founder & CEO of Cloud Currencies, dba cPay.

Jon sees money like water, and has studied the way money flows for a long time. cPay started with the question “What if we could dig ‘local trenches’ to make money flow where we wanted it to, transforming scarcity into abundance, and creating a new source of economic strength that could ‘flood’ our local economies, building community health and wealth for everyone?”

Jon has a strong interest in Rudolf Steiner’s economic indications, often referred to as Associative Economics, and has started numerous ventures and companies. Jon has ongoing interests in local currencies, local foodsheds, local energy, localizing regional economies, community-wide rewards programs, and exploring new corporate governance and management structures that are better able to support the varied interests of the community of stakeholders. Jon received his BA in Economics from U.C. Berkeley, and his ‘Green’ MBA in Sustainable Business form Marylhurst University. Jon and his wife Carrie live near Reed College, along with their two Weimaraners Henry and Evelyn.

Ryan Casey

Lead Developer, cPay

Ryan CaseyRyan Casey is a global expert on the Ethereum blockchain, making him an invaluable asset to cPay. A native of Portland, he began programming in the first grade. Ryan has been building web apps since 2011, and has focused almost exclusively on several open source projects using the Ethereum blockchain. A highly skilled programmer, Ryan is part of a global group working on the infrastructure necessary to build out the Ethereum Blockchain ecosystem, and specializes in smart contracts. Ryan states “cPay helps keep capital in the bioregional economy, which enriches all local market participants, and furthermore redirects money that would have otherwise been lost to transnational corporations into projects that directly impact the local quality of life. If you want to improve the region you live in, invest in it.”

Ryan is a programmer with Nexus Development and contributor to Maker DAO, and built our payment App from the ground up. He received his B.S. in Computer Science from George Fox University.

cPay is currently building out their technology infrastructure, and seeking mission-aligned capital for a beta launch in Portland on or around August 15. Beta testers wanted! Please signup on our mailing list on our website for more info.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What is a blockchain?
  • How blockchains function without a central command
  • What is cryptocurrency and how is value created?
  • The difference between Bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains
  • What ‘mining’ is in the context of blockchains, and how value is created
  • How value can come from proof of work or proof of stake
  • The risks of blockchains, such as the 51% attack?
  • How cryptocurrency differs from cash and credit cards
  • How Ethereum can be used with Smart Contracts
  • Why a fixed supply of cryptocurrency (e.g. Bitcoin) is not essential for value storage
  • Why half of the people on the planet will have SOME money stored in the cloud in 5-10 years
  • How CPay is able to minimize transaction fees and donate to charities of the user’s choice

Links:

Ethereum Website

CPay website

CPay Investment Page (OR Residents ONLY)

Ethereum Wikipedia Page

Vitalik Buterin’s Writings

Ethereum community on Reddit

Bitcoin community on Reddit

 

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