Author Archives: Simon Love

Living In Waste

 Living In Waste: How Our Trash Can Be Our Treasure with Michael Reynolds

In this episode, Collin Gabriel, longtime fan of Earthships, chats with architect and Earthship founder, Michael Reynolds.

35 years ago, Michael designed a living structure that can harvest its own water, power, food, heat and comfort with most of its building supplies composed of used tires, dirt, and trash. He called it the Earthship. Since then, Michael (he calls himself Mike) and the Earthship have propelled an unbelievable movement in sustainable home design, with students from all over the world descending on Taos, New Mexico, home to Earthship innovation, to learn from a team of experts while living in Earthships.

Naturally, the Earthship has captivated the minds of aspiring builders, architects, sustainability enthusiasts – humans – who are looking for a better, freer, more organic way of living. As Michael says, “The sun is our powerplant in the sky. That’s the point. All we have to do is relate to it.”

Tune in to hear how Michael stumbled across the Earthship concept, how the Earthship works, where they’ve been built, how they fulfill the needs of emergency crises, and how our waste ultimately liberates us.

Host

Collin Gabriel, Channelsmith, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Michael Reynolds, Architect, Earthship Biotecture
  • Born in 1945 and graduated from University of Cincinnati in 1969.
  • He is a self-described “guy who’s trying to do some sustainable housing for the future”
  • He believes our consumerist society is destroying our natural resources and ecosystems.
  • And thus called “King of garbage
In this episode you’ll hear about
  • The history of Michael and Earthship Biotecture, and how the Earthship design originated
  • How the Earthship focuses on 6 key principles: Comfort, Water, Natural materials, Food products, Sewage treatment, Electricity
  • Why we don’t need leaders, just roadmaps.
  • How the Earthship Academy is training a growing movement of students across the world.
  • New innovations that have been integrated into the Earthship system
  • How the Earthship design is being adapted for a diverse set of environments, as an answer to a diverse array of natural disasters
Links to Resources Mentioned Hatch Innovation Garbage Warrior Documentary Earthship Biotecture Earthship Academy Earthship Island Earthship Simple Survival app Quotes “The sun is our powerplant in the sky. That’s the point. All we have to do is relate to it.” “If you can get past the definitions, you could really live your life!” “We don’t need leaders now. We need pathways, maps. Because people are willing to go. They just need the maps.”
The post Living In Waste appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 025: Women Impact Investment

If women farmers had the same financial resources as male farmers, it’s estimated that yields would increase by 20-30%, creating the potential to lift 120-150 million people out of poverty.
—Malaika Maphalala, Investment Advisor, Natural Investments

In this podcast, Amy Pearl is joined by Malaika Maphalala and Carrie Van Winkle of Natural Investments, LLC, a socially responsible investment firm, to discuss the growing and influential role of women across the global impact investing landscape.  Carrie and Malaika also host their own web interview series called “Women Invested” that details pioneering women who are changing the world in a positive way through investment decisions.  Prepare for some inspiration, as we realize that the more we invest in women, the more we create resilient communities, and healthy returns, which is a pretty good deal.

Guests

Malaika Maphalala, Investment Advisor, Natural Investments, LLC

Joining Natural Investments was the culmination of her life-long journey of contributing to the creation of a sustainable future. For the past ten years, Malaika has shared her talents in non-profit administration and within community arts organizations in Hawaii.

Carrie B. VanWinkle, Socially Responsive Financial Advisor, Natural Investments, LLC

Carrie brings 12 years of experience working with individuals and couples to build confidence in their personal financial lives, including financial goals related to homeownership, retirement savings, and education savings. Carrie’s mission as a financial planner is rooted in the belief in the power of financial goal setting, education, and empowerment to achieve the life you want, while ensuring your finances reflect your values.

Carrie has dedicated her life to building a healthy, sustainable, and just community, both locally and globally. Her work at Natural Investments is a pivotal part in achieving this goal by empowering individuals and families to build their own financially sustainable future while having a positive impact on the community. Carrie is a part of NI’s Louisville-based team at Just Money Advisors.

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • What it Impact Investing is, and why women are playing a larger role.
  • About Malaika and Carrie’s new series on Women-Invested.com
  • Inspiring stories that can help inform your own investment decisions
  • How one investor changed the direction of Root Capital simply by being interested in women run enterprises
  • Some of the data that has emerged from impact investments worldwide
  • What regenerative investment means, and why this concept helps inform your investment decisions

The post HTF 025: Women Impact Investment appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 024: The Remedy Club Inclusion and Exclusion

htf-podcast

This edition of The Remedy Club talks about systems of exclusion — a spectrum of topics usually deemed inappropriate for the dinner table. By listening to personal stories from our panelists (see below) and conversing with each other about uncomfortable but necessary issues, we take on the challenge of breaking that initial barrier when it comes to the untalkable—starting the conversation.

Welcome to The Remedy Club, a quarterly panel series on the dynamics of power and powerlessness, hosted by Hatch Innovation. We invite you to listen in on this dynamic panel discussion recorded on November 4th, 2016. Walk away with new insight, lasting impressions, new connections and ideas for action. We hope this edition and the one before activates the reverberations and people we need for the next 4 years and beyond.

Panelists

Emilly Prado, Writer, Photographer, Future Librarian
Bertony Faustin, Wine Farmer, Abbey Creek Vineyard
Don MerrillJournalist, Author, Co-Founder of CNBSeen
Charles Letherwood, Board Member of CNBSeen

Moderator

Frankie Ku, Brand and Marketing Manager, Hatch Innovation

In this episode you will learn:

  • Stories of exclusion from audience members and panelists
  • Grassroots, micro-strategies for change
  • How to approach racism and the conversations around it
  • Ownership for solution(s) to systems of oppression
  • How to be an ally

The post HTF 024: The Remedy Club Inclusion and Exclusion appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

Toilets, Rice, and Poverty: Redefining Global Aid

toilets-rice-and-poverty

htf-podcastToilets, Rice, and Poverty: Redefining Global Aid with Lin Liu

For years, USAID and other NGOs (non-governmental organizations) have been trying to improve sanitation as well as create a safe water supply for countries throughout the developing world. With varying degrees of success in the cities, only pockets of rural communities have adopted the use of toilets as a means of disposing human waste. As the population in these areas rise, lack of safe sanitation creates an extreme health risk to children and villagers resulting in endemic diarrheal disease. There is one organization, WaterSHED, that has been working on a different approach. Host Amy Pearl had a chance to catch up with WaterSHED’s Director of Strategic Partnerships, Lin Lu, to discuss their amazing work in Cambodia, and more specifically how their market-based approach is helping to speed the adoption of safe sanitation practices in rural communities.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Executive Director, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Lin Liu, Director of Strategic Partnerships, WaterSHED

In this episode you’ll learn

  • Why sanitation projects of the past have proven ineffective, and what the barriers are in regards to sanitation in rural Cambodia
  • What collaborative approaches work best for entrepreneurs and business owners in rural communities
  • How monetary transactions work in a market for sanitation
  • About WaterSHED’s open source design for a toilet
  • How WaterSHED has fostered the behavior change necessary to encourage local adoption
  • WaterSHED’s plan for a business model change, and what methods they have used to help the market for toilets reach 40% saturation


Links to Resources Mentioned

Terms

Micro Finance Institutions (MFI): A microfinance institution is an organization that offers financial services to low income populations. Almost all give loans to their members, and many offer insurance, deposit and other services.

The post Toilets, Rice, and Poverty: Redefining Global Aid appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 022: Feminism and Justice for All

htf-podcast-june-2016-2

Let’s listen to Hatch Innovation’s Director of Events & Culinary Happenings, Jess DeNoto chat with upcoming panelist Emilly Prado. Emilly is a writer who focuses on the intersection of feminist identity, race, class, gender and popular culture. Throughout this episode, Emilly covers authors and artists who’ve inspired her over the years, to current events and the recent articles she’s researched and written, and how our own identities and perceptions play a role in the content we view.

Host

Jess DeNoto, Hatch Innovation
A native New York turned longtime Portland resident, Jess has been enjoying french presses at Hatch since its grand opening in January 2014, and currently serves as the director of ComCap Conferences, gatherings of community capital leaders from across the country. Outside of the Hatch realm, Jess is the Executive Director of Vegan Iron Chef, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organized based in Portland, OR, and is a co-founder of Vida Vegan Con (2009-2015), an award-winning international vegan lifestyle, blogging & social media conference.  She received a degree in Marketing Communication from Emerson College in Boston, MA, and spends her free time talking to her cats (Huxley & Zelda), obsessing over curry pastes, placing library holds, living car-free and cultivating a community garden plot with her wife.

This episode marks Jess’ first appearance on the Hatch the Future podcast. You can find her online as @jdfunks on Instagram and @getsconed on Twitter.

Guests

Emilly Prado, Writer, Bitch Media

Writer, photographer, and future librarian. A Chicana native of the San Francisco Bay Area, she has called Portland home since 2009. Her writing typically focuses on pop culture with an intersectional feminist lens in relation to race, class, and gender. She earned a B.A. in Child and Family Studies from Portland State University with cum laude honors, received a 2016 ALA Spectrum Scholarship, and is a current MLIS candidate at San Jose State University. Her work has appeared in Bitch Media, the Portland Mercury, Feministing, Ms. Magazine, and Travel Portland. When not writing, working, or schooling, she makes zines, sells homemade pinback buttons, and travels as much as possible. You can see her work at www.emillyprado.com

Feminist [fem-uh-nist] advocating social, political, legal, and economic rights for women, equal to those of men. Dictionary.com

“Chicana Feminism, also referred to as Xicanism, is an ideology based on the rejection of the traditional “household” role of a Mexican-American woman. In challenges the stereotypes of women across the lines of gender, ethnicity, class, race, and sexuality.” – on the Chicana Feminist Movement, Exploring the Chicana Feminist Movement umich.edu

Intersectionality is a concept often used in critical theories to describe the ways in which oppressive institutions (racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, xenophobia, classism, etc.) are interconnected and cannot be examined separately from one another. The concept first came from legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989 and is largely used in critical theories, especially Feminist theory, when discussing systematic oppression. When possible, credit Kimberlé Crenshaw for coining the term “intersectionality” and bringing the concept to wider attention. The Geek Feminism Wiki Definition of Intersectionality

In this episode you’ll hear about

  • An exploration of Intersectional Feminism
  • Recognizing the social responsibility of diversifying both professional and personal environments
  • How the editing process can change the original intent
  • Examination of identity and gender in contemporary politics and popular culture

Referenced Resources:

Referenced Articles:

Referenced Inspiration + Voices:

The post HTF 022: Feminism and Justice for All appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 021: Put Your Money Where Your Food Is

Put Your Money Where Your Food Is with Narendra Varma of Our Table Cooperative

In today’s episode, host Amy Pearl sits down with Narendra Varma of Our Table Cooperative. Narendra started Our Table Cooperative in 2011 with his wife Michelle, after they spent years in the investment and tech spaces. Narendra talks about how these experiences helped him realize a vision for a better food system and find a piece of land to achieve that vision. Our Table is a unique cooperative, because it brings together all three stakeholders: workers, consumers, and producers. What follows is an inspirational vision that we hope will spring up all over the globe.

Host

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Narendra Varma, Director, Our Table Cooperative

Born and raised in India, Narendra came to the United States in 1986 to attend Brown University. After graduating with a degree in Educational Technology, he went to work at Microsoft Corporation where his greatest achievement was a kids’ movie creation product that was a commercial dud but spawned an avid fan group. While at Microsoft, Narendra was lucky enough to meet his wife, Machelle, and receive a stockoption-fueled financial windfall allowing him to quit his day job. After an obligatory globe-trotting walkabout, Machelle and Narendra spent the next ten years raising children, renovating houses, and coming to the realization that our system of agriculture is broken, our economic and financial systems are a pyramid scheme, and that, between peak resources and climate change, our children likely face a difficult future. Unfortunately, these subjects made poor dinner conversation so Machelle and Narendra decided to devote their time, money, and energy towards an effort to reimagine our food system around the principals of Permaculture Design and Biodynamic agriculture. They purchased a 58-acre farm just outside Portland, Oregon and founded a vertically integrated food and agriculture cooperative that is experimenting with new ways to grow, process and sell food.


In this episode you’ll hear about

  • The co-operative model
  • How small the percentage of the money you pay for a crop goes to the farmer
  • How the land-use laws in Oregon helped Narendra start Our Table Cooperative
  • The role permaculture played in his design and ideation process
  • The vertical integration of food
  • The reasons for his unique blend of polyculture and monoculture farming
  • Multi-stakeholder member-owned cooperatives


Links to Resources Mentioned

Hatch Innovation

Hatch Oregon

Our Table Cooperative

Slow Money

Permaculture

Powells Books

Our Table’s Co-Op Model

The Big Short

The post HTF 021: Put Your Money Where Your Food Is appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 020: Remediation Education

Remediation Education: Rural Students Revitalizing Brownfields with Megan Alameda

 

“If you are a teacher who’s interested in brownfields, or any environmental education subject, I’d say go for it. This is the time that is ripe for innovation.  But don’t do this alone, and here’s my callout to everybody else – administrators, city and council members, museums, businesses – please come together to try and make these relevant pieces of education happen. Because that’s how it works – through collaboration.”

What happens when the industries of yesteryear close their doors for good? Often they leave behind sites that harbour contaminants, and pose a serious risk to humans and the environment. There’s a name for places like these – they are called Brownfields. These sites are literally right under our noses, and commonly overlooked by cities due to the prohibitive costs associated with restoring polluted real estate.  One program is training high school students to tackle this issue head on, and in the process giving them learning opportunities that few students get. Out in rural Baker County, Oregon, students managed the remediation process of a brownfield from start to finish – this really is true hands-on education. The site is now clean and cleared for use, and more sites are being lined up for the next generation of students. In recognition of the success of this work, the teacher who led the program, Megan Alameda, was recently awarded the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators at the White House. Amy Pearl spoke with Megan about the program to hear the full story and to get her thoughts on how this new type of hands-on education could be replicated elsewhere.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

 

Guests

Megan Alameda

In this episode you’ll learn

  • What is CTE – Career Technical Education (like Baker Technical Institute)
  • What is a Brownfield, and what impacts a brownfield site can have on the community.
  • How did Megan got involved in brownfield remediation with students, and how a group of students have taken on the role of managing the remediation process for a brownfield in Baker City, OR.
  • How this is a new wave of education, that involves students in the world around them.
  • How brownfield projects spur community development, economic development, community education
  • Upcoming projects in Baker City and the surrounding area (there are 80 potential projects just in that region).
  • How high school teachers can lead similar projects in their own location
  • How these new types of education cannot rest solely on the shoulders of teachers. It takes a lot of collaboration.


Links to Resources Mentioned

White House Announcement: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/08/15/honoring-students-and-teachers-2016-presidential-environmental-education-ceremony

DEQ Brownfields http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/cu/brownfields/

Baker County: http://www.bakercounty.org/

EPA Brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields

Oregon Health Authority Brownfields: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/Brownfields/Pages/index.aspx

Oregonian Newspaper article about Megan and her Presidential award” http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/eastern_oregon_teacher_wins_pr.html

The post HTF 020: Remediation Education appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 020: Remediation Education

remediation-education

Remediation Education: Rural Students Revitalizing Brownfields with Megan Alameda

“If you are a teacher who’s interested in brownfields, or any environmental education subject, I’d say go for it. This is the time that is ripe for innovation.  But don’t do this alone, and here’s my callout to everybody else – administrators, city and council members, museums, businesses – please come together to try and make these relevant pieces of education happen. Because that’s how it works – through collaboration.”

What happens when the industries of yesteryear close their doors for good? Often they leave behind sites that harbour contaminants, and pose a serious risk to humans and the environment. There’s a name for places like these – they are called Brownfields. These sites are literally right under our noses, and commonly overlooked by cities due to the prohibitive costs associated with restoring polluted real estate.  One program is training high school students to tackle this issue head on, and in the process giving them learning opportunities that few students get. Out in rural Baker County, Oregon, students managed the remediation process of a brownfield from start to finish – this really is true hands-on education. The site is now clean and cleared for use, and more sites are being lined up for the next generation of students. In recognition of the success of this work, the teacher who led the program, Megan Alameda, was recently awarded the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators at the White House. Amy Pearl spoke with Megan about the program to hear the full story and to get her thoughts on how this new type of hands-on education could be replicated elsewhere.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation


Links to Resources Mentioned

White House Announcement: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/08/15/honoring-students-and-teachers-2016-presidential-environmental-education-ceremony

DEQ Brownfields http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/cu/brownfields/

Baker County: http://www.bakercounty.org/

EPA Brownfields: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields

Oregon Health Authority Brownfields: https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/HealthyNeighborhoods/Brownfields/Pages/index.aspx

Oregonian Newspaper article about Megan and her Presidential award” http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/eastern_oregon_teacher_wins_pr.html

Guest

2016-08-16_presidentialeedawards_100Megan Alameda, Baker Technical Institute, Baker City, Oregon

Megan uses a collaborative and interactive teaching process that engages her students to help in the cleanup of a nearby brownfield. The project-based nature of her class allows grades 9 through 12 students to fill brownfield cleanup roles such as managers, coordinators, specialists, researchers, and presenters that best match their individual strengths. Megan’s students have learned about brownfields and presented their knowledge at a public open house and at state brownfield conferences.

 

In this episode you’ll learn

  • What is CTE – Career Technical Education (like Baker Technical Institute)
  • What is a Brownfield, and what impacts a brownfield site can have on the community.
  • How did Megan got involved in brownfield remediation with students, and how a group of students have taken on the role of managing the remediation process for a brownfield in Baker City, OR.
  • How this is a new wave of education, that involves students in the world around them.
  • How brownfield projects spur community development, economic development, community education
  • Upcoming projects in Baker City and the surrounding area (there are 80 potential projects just in that region).
  • How high school teachers can lead similar projects in their own location
  • How these new types of education cannot rest solely on the shoulders of teachers. It takes a lot of collaboration.

 

The post HTF 020: Remediation Education appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 019: Changing Taillights to Avert Tragedies

Changing Taillights to Avert Tragedies

“For many people this is not a huge problem, but for a percentage of people, it can be a deadly problem.” – Don Merrill


Think about it. For some people, a burned-out taillight is a minor maintenance issue. For others, it’s the first step towards a potentially deadly confrontation. After a string of police shootings of unarmed people of color, Don Merrill wants to stop talking and do something. So he’s setting up a nonprofit with a very simple goal: to replace burned-out headlights and taillights on vehicles driven by people of color.

In this episode Amy and Don discuss how this easy step could result in fewer hostile interactions with police, a strengthening of community, and more open discussions between police and residents. You’ll hear how everyone from community colleges to auto parts stores to churches will be involved, and get an insight into the statistics that show why this project is so needed.

Provocateur

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

 

Guests

Don Merrill – Owner, Don Merrill & Associates

Currently, working on a book about the public radio pledge drive.

Seven years with Armed Forces Radio and Television. Eleven years as a public relations specialist for the Federal Government. Four years with commercial radio and newspapers. Four years as a freelance writer specializing in feature and investigative reporting.

Goals include telling the little stories of big companies and the big stories of little companies for domestic and international reading audiences. My intention is to build a clientel of commercial, government and non-profit clients who turn to me to promote their work in consumer and trade, print and online publications by emphasizing the human side of that work. I am especially interested in the work of non-profits and am prone to donate work to good causes.

Specialties: Interviewing experience with celebrities, government officials, politicians and man-on-the-street (vox populi). Government and military procedures and protocols experience.

In this episode you’ll learn

  • About Don’s inspiration for starting a nonprofit that does nothing but change headlight/taillight bulbs- “I wanted to stop talking, and stop being consumed by other people talking, and do something.”
  • Why this project is bottom up instead of top down – going into communities and talking to people where they are.
  • The partners will be involved in the project – churches, colleges or places that have automotive repair programs, auto parts stores, community groups.
  • The data that makes this project so compelling.
  • How many people have no concern they’ll be pulled over by police for a broken taillight, let alone be shot by police – while for others it’s a real fear.
  • How so many bad things happen on a daily basis that compete for our attention, resulting in easily-fixable things getting lost in the noise.
  • Why vilifying police or protesters doesn’t fix anything.
  • About ‘broken windows’ policing, and how it has been criticized for leading to assumptions that every car with a broken taillight contains a person of color about to do wrong.
  • How just because officers look like the communities they serve, doesn’t mean that the people in those communities will feel any safer or better treated by the police.
  • What happened when Amy did not behave in the correct way when pulled over, and how that could not happen had she been a person of color.
  • After everything that has happened recently, Don wanted to stop talking, and stop being consumed by other people talking, and do something.
  • How the solutions will be imperfect, but perfect is the enemy of the good. 

 

Links to Resources Mentioned

How to reach Don – CNBSeen: @CNBSeenNow

Don’t shoot PDX https://www.facebook.com/DontShootPDX/

Black Lives Matter http://blacklivesmatter.com/

Driving While Black app: http://dwbtheapp.com/

NAACP Statement on Eric Garner death & ‘broken windows’ policing: http://www.naacp.org/press/entry/naacp-statement-on-death-of-nyc-man-after-police-chokehold

The post HTF 019: Changing Taillights to Avert Tragedies appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 018: Finding a Career with Purpose

Finding a Career with Purpose

Finding a Career with Purpose


An honest discussion about finding jobs with meaning – both making a difference in the world, and finding personal satisfaction.
Simon Love and Amy Pearl speak with Mac Prichard, founder of Prichard Communications and Mac’s List about purpose and potential in work and life. Today, people want to improve the world through their work, as well as achieve personal satisfaction. But how do people get into those careers? In this podcast, both hosts and guest are able to share stories and advice of finding work with meaning. Mac offers insights from his conversations with jobseekers, Simon offers personal stories of finding work in a foreign land, and Amy shares stories of change makers starting their own enterprises. You’ll learn tips and advice on how to send your career on a path towards purpose.

This conversation carries on the conversation from the popular ‘Career Pathways to Doing Good in Oregon’ events,  held quarterly at HatchLab in Portland, Oregon.

 

Provocateurs

Amy Pearl, Hatch Innovation

Simon Love, Hatch Innovation

 

Guest

Mac Prichard, President, Pritchard Communications

Mac Prichard owns and operates Prichard Communications, a public relations agency based in Portland, Oregon that works with top-tier foundations, non-profits and purpose driven brands across the country. He is also the publisher of Mac’s List, an online community where professionals find rewarding, interesting jobs and employers find the best possible candidates.

Previously, Mac was communications director for Reclaiming Futures, a national initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that improves drug and alcohol treatment for teens in juvenile court. Before joining Reclaiming Futures in 2001, Mac served as a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Human Services, a speechwriter and deputy legislative director for former Oregon governor John Kitzhaber, and a Portland City Hall spokesman for Earl Blumenauer, now a Member of Congress.

Prior to moving to Oregon in 1991, Mac lived in Massachusetts where he was legislative and media relations director for the state Office for Refugees and Immigrants, the first public information officer for Boston’s “Big Dig,” and a researcher in former U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy’s first Congressional campaign. Previously in Boston as a staff person with the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, Mac helped organize and lead four Congressional fact-finding trips to Central America. Mac was also a senior researcher at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs, a non-partisan human rights group in Washington, DC, that monitors US-Latin American policy.

In this episode you’ll learn

  • Trends in the workplace – are people moving towards careers with purpose? If so, why?
  • What a ‘Dream Job’ means – people want to make a difference in the world but they also want to find satisfaction and happiness.
  • How Mac’s List grew through word of mouth, and where it extends now.
  • How people are not taught at school how to look for jobs, or to set job-related goals.
  • Why do people work?
  • How generational differences and the blurring of work-life boundaries affect how work is seen.
  • Why jobseekers say they want one type of job but take something else .
  • How you can make opportunities happen by being generous to others and thinking about how you can help others in your industry.
  • How sometimes you won’t end up doing what you thought you’d be doing, but you can take charge of the role you’re in and make a difference there.  
  • How individuals can make enormous difference through starting their own social enterprise.
  • The challenges of being an entrepreneur – ‘pushing the noodle up the hill’ and the challenges associated with it.
  • How careers are not a 45 degree trajectory – there will be peaks and valleys.
  • How good things happen when you make your goals known to others.


Links to Resources Mentioned

Hatch Innovation

Mac’s List

‘Find Your Dream Job’ Podcast

‘Find Your Dream Job in Portland’ Book

Prichard Communications

Career Pathways to Doing Good in Oregon event

The post HTF 018: Finding a Career with Purpose appeared first on Hatch Innovation.