Author Archives: Danielle Olson

HTF 030: Tea Fleets and Painted Streets

Picture yourself strolling down the beautiful tree-lined streets of Portland when suddenly you are struck by the sight of a large mural painted right in the middle of a 4-way stop. As you stand there, thinking to yourself “how did this get here? Who made this place?”, you notice a bench made out of clay, open and inviting, placed on the sidewalk and right next to a tiny neighborhood library. You sit and take in this odd, idyllic scene—spending a moment to connect with your surroundings.

Very often these murals and sculptures are the work of collaborative, community projects facilitated by City Repair, a group of permaculturists, anthropologists, environmentalists, and citizens devoted to bringing neighbors together through neighborhood projects.

In this episode, Collin Gabriel and Frankie Ku sit down with RIdhi D’Cruz, Adrian Haley, and Jasmine Co from City Repair to discuss placemaking, houselessness, chocolate cake, a tea “horse”, and the upcoming 17th Annual Village Building Convergence, a 10-day spread of permaculture, natural-building, and intersection painting events open to all!

Hosts

Collin Gabriel, Channelsmith, Hatch Innovation

Frankie Ku, Brand and Marketing Manager, Hatch Innovation

Guests

Ridhi D’Cruz, Co-Director of City Repair

Ridhi D’Cruz is a Co-Director with City Repair. This is her sixth year working with City Repair and the Village Building Convergence. As an intercontinental cross-pollinator, sociocultural anthropologist and permaculture educator who has been living in Portland since 2010, Ridhi participates, facilitates and supports Placemaking capacity building, houseless advocacy, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Cultural Sustainability, Social Permaculture and transformational leadership development. She is also a passionate herbalist, urban wild-crafter, natural building enthusiast, participatory technology activist, animal lover and permaculture urban homesteader.

 

Adrian Thalasinos Haley, Volunteer at City Repair

Adrian Thalasinos Haley, a BFA alumni in sculpture from UW Madison, joined the larger movement of Portland’s creative, justice driven, and growth motivated communities over 13 years ago. His unique blend of skills and experience in metal fabrication, construction, and marine engineering has empowered his gadgeteer and mad-scientist spirit.

He served as welder for Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, an ocean going environmental organization, from 2003-2005, and occupied his time inventing and implementing various ocean defence projects around the world. In 2006, he co-formed the Gadgetron, a community shop in the Portsmouth neighborhood of North Portland that explored appropriate technology(1). Its intention was to liberate technology from industry and empower individuals to be makers, fixers, and creators. Adrian also served as the tool coordinator at the North Portland Tool Library in 2007.

Crows Foot Creatives is a project that Adrian started up to crystallize his maker skills and make them available to the larger Portland community. He has since served small business and co-ops, organizations, and individuals in their desire to implement their visions.

 

Jasmine Co, Intern at City Repair

Jasmine Co is a PSU student, artist, and massage therapist. She has a passion for ecological change and collective growth. This year she is excited to be interning with City Repair and the Village Building Convergence. Jasmine has been focusing on their newest mobile placemaking project, the T-crab.

In this episode you’ll learn

  1. The inspiring history of City Repair and how it was founded.
  2. All about the Village Building Convergence and how you can get involved.
  3. Shared experiences that deepen community by connecting neighbors and neighborhoods
  4. How to work with local government to develop codes and laws that meet the needs of community members
  5. How the team at City Repair utilizes a largely volunteer staff.
  6. Decision-making strategies for building community
  7. Why process development is the primary goal of the VBC
  8. Where and when you can find yourself under the T-Horse and the rest of the T-Fleet.

The post HTF 030: Tea Fleets and Painted Streets appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

HTF 029: ‘Soup’er Communities

In this episode, Danielle Olson sits down with Amy Kaherl, founder of Detroit Soup. In 2010, Amy was able to transform a small potluck-style event for funding the arts into a larger funding mechanism for community projects aimed to do good for Detroit. For as little as $5, attendees eat, hear pitches from entrepreneurs, vote for a winner to receive the cumulative funds, and ultimately create change.

Detroit Soup has hosted 151 meetings as of this podcast and has become an international movement, with communities developing their own unique flavor of this original event (including our own here at HatchLab, The Social Pitch). Added to that, Detroit Soup has managed to raise over $132,000 dollars directly from the Detroit community, directly for the Detroit community. Listen in to Amy’s inspiring thoughts about its journey, and how entrepreneurship and community-building intersect.

Host

Danielle Olson, Program Manager, Hatch Innovation

Guest

Amy Kaherl, Founder of Detroit Soup

More about Amy Kaherl:

I love Detroit. Detroit is unique as it is enormous. People here are passionate without large egos and are eager to problem solve with amazing and unique ideas. I started with SOUP in 2010 with some fiercely passionate ladies who were excited to try out an idea in a loft above a bakery. Never in my wildest imagination did I think it would grow to become a staple to the flow of the city. I studied theology and popular culture at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA after growing up and going to college in Michigan. I wanted to study connection and meaning in our everyday experiences and since departing in 2008 I have found the ability to do that here in Detroit. SOUP is a place for connecting with people who begin as strangers and become friends, a safe space to explore what matters to us as individuals and as a community, and a place to practice democracy. When I am not running SOUP, I help curate events at The Jam Handy and DJ as Amy Dreamcatcher with the monthly Nothing Elegant! If you have further questions or want to connect, please feel free to email me!

In this episode you’ll learn

  • The origin story of Detroit Soup and how it has become an international movement.
  • Amy’s thoughts on what community is, and how events like Detroit Soup can help to cultivate it.
  • Lessons learned from the years of hosting community pitch events
  • A step-by-step process on how Detroit Soup runs their event.
  • How the Soup community events can cultivate synergies between entrepreneurs.

The post HTF 029: ‘Soup’er Communities appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

Recap: The Social Pitch VII

The following five presenters pitched their ideas at The Social Pitch VII on April 30, 2017. The community came together at HatchLab PDX to eat soup, hear the presenters’ ideas, and vote for their favorite. Scroll further to see how you might be able to help each of these budding entrepreneurs.

Neighborhood Nanny (1st place)

Neighborhood Nanny was created during a frantic few days during a frantic few days in July. Amber was desperate for childcare so that she could attend a business workshop she had been invited to. The cost of two full days of childcare was equal to three weeks of groceries for her and her son. This was a once in a lifetime opportunity that had been offered and as a full-time student, single parent, and entrepreneur she had to weigh the options. Amber decided to go for it, because it would benefit her son’s future. From this experience, Amber found a deep need in the community and now wants to make sure other parents never have to decide between groceries or their future.

Amber has over twenty years of childcare experience and almost a decade of working with low-income families. She has served on the Board of Directors at Street Roots and Advisory Board at Heroes for the Homeless, in Seattle. Amber spends her time playing with her three-year-old son, Michael, studying, and thinking up activities for the other amazing kids in her life.

Change Mail (2nd place)

Change Mail provides kits that help people find their voice and make critical community connections through handwritten mail to friends, family, civic leaders and community organizations.

Kate is a lifelong snail mail lover. She believes we can influence social change movements and strengthen communities by giving voice to our values in letter writing campaigns and notes of love to those in need. Kate’s vision is to help people send snail mail more often, developing a practice of engagement, positivity and mindfulness for themselves, while their acts of kindness and advocacy benefit their community.

In addition to crafting and sending cards (follow her crafting life on Instagram @snailmailcreations) and working on Change Mail, Kate is passionate about her day job as the Community Engagement Officer for Beneficial State Foundation. She loves talking about the movement for values-driven banking and how Beneficial State Bank’s triple-bottom-line model can drive positive social and environmental outcomes.

Grandma’s Pop-Up Café

Grandma’s Pop-Up Café will appear in neighborhood restaurants, other food-focused businesses, and community organizations with food preparation facilities. The café events will be organized by a neighborhood group which include seniors, chefs, gardeners, and others interested in volunteering their time. Seniors will be encouraged to share their recipes and if they choose to demonstrate the recipes for the chefs and others interested in learning them. The cafe’ events will be well publicized and outreach actively done to ensure that seniors are motivated to and supported to attend. Meal charges will be “Pay As You Feel”.

Liz, Roger, and the rest of Grandma Pop-Up Crew are strategically designed to align the multi-industry skills needed to execute food service by a guest Grandma Chef Lead in partner restaurants in the Portland Metro area. The multi-industry skills are partnership building, volunteer resource management and food service.

VR4U America

VR4U America uses donated cell phones from 2014 onward, along with a low cost and durable virtual reality (VR) headset to allow inner city students the chance to experience things that budget cuts have denied them. We take one person’s trash and transform it into a treasured tool for learning. Reviving what would otherwise be waste to inspire youth to aim higher and dream bigger. Give young students the chance to experience the world outside of what they see every day and they will want to see it. This could become the driving force to bring whole communities out of poverty.

Lucas Gudman is currently a Bachelors in Electrical Engineer student at PSU. He has built a new headset for this project that allows older phones to run virtual reality programs for longer. He is inspired to provide alternative learning experiences to students because of his own experience being involved with the Evergreen Air & Space Museum growing up.

Being There Café

Being There Café is the rushing of the river. It is clean air, the glowing of green and the rolling of the wave. Nature deficit has created a an acceptance of the status quo borne of a feeling of powerlessness and overwhelm at the complexity of environmental issues. Nature immersion provided by Being There Café will inspire action by using awe and innovative technology to empower – all over your morning cup of sustainably grown coffee. Being There Café is coffee café with a conscience.

An aspiring entrepreneur endeavoring to blaze alternative paths to environmental awareness, Holly is working full time, going to school part time and organizing a green team as an Agent of Change for the Center for Earth Leadership. Merging her passion for the environment and her love of artistic creation she has concentrated the use of recycled materials in her art work and encourage others to do the same—including organizing a Recycled Art Fair as a fundraiser for Work for Art. Holly has engaged in environmental efforts in Utah, New York and New Jersey.

Interested in helping out these budding entrepreneurs? Check out their list of needs below and contact them with resources, ideas, and connections you may have.

The post Recap: The Social Pitch VII appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

The Social Pitch Update: Ground Up PDX

As we get ready for our next round of The Social Pitch, we asked our winners from last August, Ground Up PDX, to give us an update. Ground Up is a social enterprise that trains disadvantaged women in the Greater Portland area in marketable skills through the production and sales of delicious nut butters!

From Julie of Ground Up:

We have been excited by the progress we have been making over the last couple months! We recently got our product into new retailers: Cherry Sprouts Produce Market and P’s and Q’s Market  We have a number of larger grocery stores that we have been developing relationships with and are hoping to get in over the next few months. We also just purchased our own  machinery, which is a huge step for us!  Now we are more motivated than ever to bring in the orders to pay off the machine!

Our current intern Ruth (referred through Outside In) has been a great fit for our team. She has been a huge help for us and has also been excited by all the learning opportunities.

“This job is so fun!  Working in the kitchen is therapeutic.  I love getting the opportunity to take ownership on certain tasks and that my bosses trust me to own it and do the job well!” —Ruth
Most recently in the press, we were featured in the Business Tribune after presenting in the Elevating Impact Pitch Fest.

Thanks for the update Julie! We’ll see you all at the next Social Pitch on April 30th!

The post The Social Pitch Update: Ground Up PDX appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

What Does a Center for Entrepreneurship Look Like?

20160803_084323

It started with a vision for a community innovation lab.

We first dreamed up HatchLab over five years ago, it has been two years and nine months since we opened the doors of our community innovation lab in Portland. Our space and our community have gone through plenty of evolution in that time. We’ve added spaces, adjusted our program offerings, grown our network, and added new technology. We’ve learned what works well for entrepreneurs, and what doesn’t. We’ve learned how to use our space as a leverage to start conversations with the broader community about purpose, entrepreneurship, equity, and investing in one’s community.

 

It’s time to work with more communities in Oregon.

Although we are still learning everyday, we’ve grown our capacity enough to be able to open a new community innovation space, leveraging all the knowledge we’ve gathered over the past few years, and this time putting it to use in a rural community. Baker City is the home of our new community innovation lab in Northeast Oregon. We are very excited to see what it’s like to bring our programs and services to this new area, and to elevate the work that locals are doing in Baker to help small business.

 

A rural center for entrepreneurship: HatchLab Baker

We have kicked off our participation on Baker City’s entrepreneurial scene by gathering and working closely with about two dozen entrepreneurs and technical service providers in the area. We opened our doors on Halloween to welcome the 3000+ trick-or-treaters that visit downtown Baker City.

HatchLab Baker is located on 2019 A Main Street. Please, come visit us! If you have any questions, please contact the HatchLab Baker Manager, Bryan Tweit at bryan@hatchthefuture.org.

We expect to learn even more from this new endeavor—lessons that we will put to use in our new home in Baker City, and back at our first home in Portland.

 

The post What Does a Center for Entrepreneurship Look Like? appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

What Does a Center for Entrepreneurship Look Like?

20160803_084323

It started with a vision for a community innovation lab.

We first dreamed up HatchLab over five years ago, it has been two years and nine months since we opened the doors of our community innovation lab in Portland. Our space and our community have gone through plenty of evolution in that time. We’ve added spaces, adjusted our program offerings, grown our network, and added new technology. We’ve learned what works well for entrepreneurs, and what doesn’t. We’ve learned how to use our space as a leverage to start conversations with the broader community about purpose, entrepreneurship, equity, and investing in one’s community.

 

It’s time to work with more communities in Oregon.

Although we are still learning everyday, we’ve grown our capacity enough to be able to open a new community innovation space, leveraging all the knowledge we’ve gathered over the past few years, and this time putting it to use in a rural community. Baker City is the home of our new community innovation lab in Northeast Oregon. We are very excited to see what it’s like to bring our programs and services to this new area, and to elevate the work that locals are doing in Baker to help small business.

 

A rural center for entrepreneurship: HatchLab Baker

We have kicked off our participation on Baker City’s entrepreneurial scene by gathering and working closely with about two dozen entrepreneurs and technical service providers in the area. We opened our doors on Halloween to welcome the 3000+ trick-or-treaters that visit downtown Baker City.

HatchLab Baker is located on 2019 A Main Street. Please, come visit us! If you have any questions, please contact the HatchLab Baker Manager, Bryan Tweit at bryan@hatchthefuture.org.

We expect to learn even more from this new endeavor—lessons that we will put to use in our new home in Baker City, and back at our first home in Portland.

 

The post What Does a Center for Entrepreneurship Look Like? appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

Forbes: Hatch Oregon And Intrastate Crowdfunding Get A Boost From SEC Rule

amy-pearl-glamour-shot-1

amy-pearl-glamour-shot-1

“There’s been a lot of press about the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act and its opening up of equity crowdfunding to unaccredited investors. What’s received less attention is intrastate crowdfunding–platforms that, as the name suggests, allow small investors to put their money into local businesses, opening up a new source of funding for social enterprises and other startups…”

Read more from Anne Field on Forbes

The post Forbes: Hatch Oregon And Intrastate Crowdfunding Get A Boost From SEC Rule appeared first on Hatch Innovation.

Wallowa County: Joseph Business Launches Community Public Offering

BGood Bars of Joseph is looking to take advantage of a new state law that allows community members to invest in Oregon businesses and encourages Oregon’s entrepreneurs to raise capital from their neighbors. The Northeast Oregon...

The post Wallowa County: Joseph Business Launches Community Public Offering appeared first on Hatch.

Meet ComCap16 Exhibitor: John MacDougall of MacDougall & Sons Bat Company

Like everyone at ComCap16, our exhibitors are exciting, handpicked, and do awesome things for their communities! We wanted to give them an opportunity to introduce themselves. Up next is John MacDougall, founder of MacDougall & Sons...

The post Meet ComCap16 Exhibitor: John MacDougall of MacDougall & Sons Bat Company appeared first on Hatch.